The World Figmented

sosuperawesome:

Small and miniature oil paintings by Jessica Gardner

z-i-v-a:

drew one of my most favourite characters in the world. not aallll that pleased with it but oh well…

z-i-v-a:

drew one of my most favourite characters in the world. not aallll that pleased with it but oh well…

lillycaul:

I always find it so funny when people bitch about ‘forced diversity’.

because, like, once you work retail you start to see just how different everybody is.

for example, the other day I greeted a woman I was ringing up and started asking her the usual questions we’re supposed to ask (if they have a rewards card, etc) and she made a gesture pointing to her ear and mouthed ‘I’m deaf’. 

and I was just like ‘Oh’, and so I skipped over the questions and just gave her a nice smile instead of the usual schpiel we’re supposed to give. she thanked me in sign language and smiled back before walking away.

and that’s just one tiny example. she was just one customers of hundreds that shift. that’s not even mentioning all the other types of people I ring in a day, of all ages, body sizes, races/skin colors, and gender expression.

it’s like…that’s how the world is. 

when people say having diversity in a fictional universe seems ‘false’ or ‘forced’, that says to me that they must exist in a very homogenous, sheltered environment. because even working for a company that has a rather disproportionately-high white middle-class customer demographic, I still see more diversity on any given day than I tend to ever see in books and movies and TV shows.

it’s just kind of laughable to me when people say a movie/book/franchise has “too much” diversity. because there’s no such thing.

kaargue:

escape!!

aesirthor:

fangirl challenge: female character [5/10] » frigga

Tatiana Maslany about Skyler Wexler (Kira Manning)

History is not a long series of centuries in which men did all the interesting/important things and women stayed home and twiddled their thumbs in between pushing out babies, making soup and dying in childbirth.

History is actually a long series of centuries of men writing down what they thought was important and interesting, and FORGETTING TO WRITE ABOUT WOMEN. It’s also a long series of centuries of women’s work and women’s writing being actively denigrated by men. Writings were destroyed, contributions were downplayed, and women were actively oppressed against, absolutely.

But the forgetting part is vitally important. Most historians and other writers of what we now consider “primary sources” simply didn’t think about women and their contribution to society. They took it for granted, except when that contribution or its lack directly affected men.

This does not in any way mean that the female contribution to society was in fact less interesting or important, or complicated, simply that history—the process of writing down and preserving of the facts, not the facts/events themselves—was looking the other way.

Tansy Rayner Roberts

I actually recommend the entire post, especially if you like history or fantasy or writing. 

(via rebelwomen)

notch-memo:

All that we have, all that we had.

Full image:[600 X 3822]

ryanpanos:

Frozen Venice | Robert Jahns | Via

frilllyknickers:

martinhsu:

Romantic Storms

Passage & Shelter

New paintings for Archimedes Gallery

Limited edition prints available online here

- Martin

Holy fuck